The Mountain House High School aquatic center is slated to open June 27, and school district officials are making plans for future community swim programs.

During a meeting of the Lammersville Unified School District Governing Board last Wednesday, Chief Business Official Alvina Keyser told the board that the facilities committee was recommending priority use for high school-based groups, such as the swim and water polo teams.

She said the school’s athletic director would be given a couple of weeks to identify when those programs would need the pool, and after that the district could begin planning to open the facility at 1090 S. Central Parkway to other groups.

“We do not have any public swim scheduled at this time, but it’s not to say that will change in the future,” she said.

She told the board that the committee also recommended adding the aquatic center as a school facility rental option on the district’s website for civic permits, allowing facility use applications to be issued and approving a use fee similar to Tracy Unified School District’s fees.

The board adopted all the committee’s recommendations on a 4-0 vote with David Pombo absent.

Keyser said the cost to use the pool would range from $50 to $80 an hour with a two-hour minimum rental. She said aquatic center rules would also require rental groups to provide certified lifeguards to supervise people in the pool — one lifeguard for every 25 swimmers.

Residents will be able to check the calendar on the civic permits website to see when the aquatic center is available, Keyser said. She also said there will more than likely be groups that decide to rent the pool and open it up for public swimming for a fee.

Superintendent Kirk Nicholas said that the pool was filled with water on the day of the meeting and that he was eager to tell the community it was scheduled to open this month. He said the water would help cure the plaster, and then the water needed to be treated to be safe for human use, which takes a few weeks. Around the end of June, the pool will be ready to be turned over to the district by Turner Construction.

Construction of the aquatic center began in September at a cost of $4.6 million for the pool, pool house, solar heating panels and other elements, Nicholas said.

Funding for the aquatic center was made available through the passage of Measure L in June 2016. The bond provided the district with $56 million to help fund the construction of a kindergarten through eighth-grade school in Hansen Village and complete the final phase of the high school, including the theater and library.

With the aquatic center policies approved, Nicholas said the district could begin looking into rentals by outside organizations that would provide programs for the community. He said the goal was to build a pool on campus as part of the final phase of the high school construction and keep the promise of community access to that pool.

Trustee Matthew Balzarini said Wednesday that the aquatic center was the result of “blood, sweat and tears by so many people.”

“The work tonight is taking the first step,” he said. “We’re working on policies, fee schedules — and yes, definitely, it will be available to the public. We’re just working out the details right now. We want to get the community in there as much as we can, as often as we can.”

He said that LUSD officials will eventually oversee public swim programs and that those programs are under discussion by the facilities committee, whose next meeting is July 27 in the district office.

Contact Denise Ellen Rizzo at drizzo@tracypress.com or 830-4225.

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